Kamenz / Saxony

There were good reasons for the Thingplatz of Kamenz to be favored in terms of planning and funding and to be completed as the first one in Saxony. Due to the proximity of three camps of the Reichsarbeitsdienstes (Reich Labour Service) there was a large workforce on hand and there was also a military training ground nearby. The location was not far away from the scheduled Reichsautobahn (highway in the Third Reich). A war monument in close proximity gave the Thingplatz more prominence. Kamenz was also significant from a cultural point of view: it is the hometown of Lessing. – Another advantage was the town’s frontier position to the Sorbian and Slavic language region and therefore the gateway to the Sorbian area of settlement, which was significant for the politics of the National Socialism with regards to the Lebensraum in the East. Today the area is being used as an open-air theater. [1][2][3]

Start of construction / inauguration

03/10/1934 / 06/02/1935

Architect

Ludwig Moshamer, Berlin

Name historical / contemporary

Thingplatz / Hutbergbühne[4]

Historical use

June 01/02 1935Handover play by A. Schroeder
06/22/1935Solstice Celebrations
Unknown“Neurode” by Kurt Heynicke
August 1937“Spiel vom Kamenzer Forstfest”

[5][6]

Use today 

Many concerts and events are being held all year long on the grounds.

https://www.hutbergbuehne-kamenz.de/

Interesting fact

The perfomances during the National Socialism constituted of a huge number of actors and supporting cast. Sometimes there were almost more people on stage than in the audience”. [7]


[1] Stommer, Rainer, Die inszenierte Volksgemeinschaft, Jonas- Verlag, Marburg, 1985, page 213

[2] Bosse, Katharina, Thingstätten, Kerber- Verlag, Bielefeld, 2020, page 120/121

[3] Hermann, Matthias, Thingplatz und Kriegerehrenmal auf dem Hutberg in Kamenz, publisher, location, 1993, page 17

[4] Stommer, page 213

[5] Stommer, Rainer, Die inszenierte Volksgemeinschaft, Jonas- Verlag, Marburg, 1985, page 213

[6] Bosse, page 120/121

[7] Ebd., from an Interview with City Chronist Thomas Binder